Simply put, it’s a disease that affects your brain and spinal cord.

The body has trillions of nerve cells. Each of these nerve cells have a protective coating around them. Kinda like the plastic around the wires of your phone charger.

In MS, the body thinks this protective coating is a virus and starts destroying it, leaving the nerve cells inside damaged.

Question: If the wires in your phone charger got damaged, would it still work the same way?

No, it wouldn’t. Because the electricity isn’t able to get from the plug to your phone, or in the case of your body, from one nerve cell in the brain to the nerve cell in, say, your foot. That’s why we all have different symptoms because different nerve cells are affected.

If this chain of nerve cells between your brain and a different part of your body get broken, it starts to cause chaos in the body. Messages aren’t getting to where they need to be, and that could mean that messages from the brain can’t get to another part of your body, for example, your legs and they can’t talk to each other, leaving it difficult for the person to walk.

These nerve cells getting broken means that we get lots of different symptoms and because the nerves are broken in a different part of each of our brains it means that each of us get different symptoms.

Things to know about MS:

  • The nerve damage in the brain is called a Lesion
  • MS is normally controlled using drug therapy (called DMT’s)
  • No two people with MS have the same symptoms (we are like snowflakes)
  • MS is not contagious
  • MS is generally diagnosed in people who are between 20 and 40 years old and 2/3 are female
  • There are 3 main types of MS: Relapsing-Remitting (the most common), Primary Progressive and Secondary Progressive
  • A person with MS can have children
  • You can live a healthy long life with MS provided you look after yourself. Check out my 7 free hacks download for living well with your MS HERE
  • MS doesn’t necessarily mean you will be in a wheelchair, I worried about that a lot at the start

Do you or someone you know have MS? Do you have any questions about MS? Ask them in the comments.


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